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First Graydon Nicholas Aboriginal Scholarship awarded

Wed September 1, 2010

Maliseet student receives first Graydon Nicholas Aboriginal Scholarship in Engineering

Engineers and Geoscientists New Brunswick (APEGNB) has awarded its first Graydon Nicholas Aboriginal Scholarship in Engineering to a third-year mechanical engineering student at the University of New Brunswick.

John Cloutier, a member of the Madawaska Maliseet First Nation, received the $3000 renewable scholarship at a recent ceremony at Government House in Fredericton.

“I was very pleased to learn I would be the first to receive this substantial scholarship,” said Mr. Cloutier. “It couldn’t have come at a better time. Post-secondary education is expensive. This financial assistance will allow me to concentrate more on my studies rather than on how to pay for my education.”

Named in honour of New Brunswick’s first Aboriginal Lieutenant-Governor, the Graydon Nicholas Aboriginal Scholarship in Engineering was established in 2010 to encourage more New Brunswick students from First Nations to
John Cloutier (second from right), a third-year mechanical engineering student at UNB, is awarded the $3000 renewable scholarship during a recent ceremony at Government House in Fredericton. Also pictured are (L to R): Andrew McLeod, FEC (Hon), executive director of Engineers and Geoscientists New Brunswick (APEGNB); Lt. Gov. Graydon Nicholas and APEGNB president, Bruce Broster, P.Geo.

pursue an engineering education. It is available annually to one Aboriginal person in New Brunswick who has been accepted into an engineering program at the University of New Brunswick or Université de Moncton.

Bruce Broster, P.Geo., president of APEGNB, says the scholarship seemed like a perfect way to commemorate the Association’s 90th anniversary as a regulatory body. “Our Association has been regulating and licensing the engineering profession since 1920. We represent more than 5000 members from all kinds of backgrounds. Establishing this scholarship enabled us to mark this milestone in our history with something that celebrates and encourages the continued diversity of our professions.”

Lt. Gov. Nicholas added, “Aboriginal communities need more engineers as role models. I am proud that this scholarship bears my name and hope it helps more students from our First Nations realize that engineering is a prestigious, in-demand and attainable profession.”

Mr. Cloutier hopes to earn his P.Eng. designation after graduation and then return to the Madawaska Maliseet First Nation in Edmundston. “I would love to use my skills as a professional engineer to benefit my community, and maybe even serve as role model for other Aboriginal students who have an aptitude for math and science and want to help others.”

Administered by APEGNB’s Foundation for Education, the Graydon Nicholas Aboriginal Scholarship in Engineering is a renewable scholarship for up to five years based on satisfactory academic performance. It may be used to help offset the costs of tuition, textbooks, transportation and living expenses while attending university.

To apply, or to learn more about the criteria for the scholarship, contact APEGNB’s Foundation for Education at 506-451-9624 or email